Sources of Spring Energy

There are 5 Sources of Spring Energy 

We call the forms of energy that exists in nature for 'Primary energy'.

Let's take them one at a time and follow them to the point where we begin to exploit them.

Scroll for at forsætte

Fissile elements from supernovae

The uranium we use in nuclear power plants comes from very large stars that burned out many years ago and exploded in what we call supernovae. The fissile elements were sent into space as  an interstellar cloud of dust (nebulae). The earth was later formed from these nebulae. By splitting the nucleus of an atom into its component, we can recover some of the energy that binds the neutrons and the protons  together in the core. We call this the 'Nuclear'

Nuclear power plants as we know them today, are not renewable energy because the amount of uranium on earth is limited and final. There is not being supplied continuously more uranium from space.

Scroll for at forsætte

Electromagnetic radiation from the sun

The energy from the sun comes from the core processes in which light atomic nuclei fuse together, and emits energy. The energy comes to earth in the form of electromagnetic radiation -what we call the sun's rays.

The sun warms the oceans. Some of the water evaporates, rises, and is blown into the country. Here, the water vapor condenses and becomes rain. When rain water flows back to the sea, we can use the energy thus formed in our energy system. This kind of energy we call hydro power.

Scroll for at forsætte

Electromagnetic radiation from the sun

We can also directly transform electromagnetic radiation from the sun into electricity in solar PV and some of the solar energy we use for heating via solar heating systems and heat pumps

We call this solar energy, because here we directly use the electromagnetic rays from the sun in our energy system

Scroll for at forsætte

Electromagnetic radiation from the sun

A portion of the energy from the sun heats the land and seas, and creates high and low pressure. This creates air streams. The air streams run from high to low pressure. We can use these flows directly in our energy system. This kind of energy we call "Wind".

The wind creates waves on the ocean. The energy contained in the waves we call "Wave". The sun creates temperature differences in the oceans, and the temperature differences creates water current. This energy we call "Ocean Currents".

Scroll for at forsætte

Electromagnetic radiation from the sun

The plants on Earth absorbs radiation from the sun and converts it - through photosynthesis – to binding energy between atomic nuclei in organic material. People and animals eat some of this energy in the form of food. The waste products from our - and animals - digestion of the foods we use in the energy system to produce biogas and biodegradable waste. Some of the energy is saved in the form of biomass.

The part that is not used for food, we can utilize as biomass in the energy system. Biomass, which was formed on earth for many hundreds of years ago and which is now stored in the form of coal, oil and natural gas in the subsurface, we call fossil fuels. A small part of the fossil energy is used in the chemical industry, which produces products that are not bio-degradable, and when it becomes waste can be converted into energy.

Scroll for at forsætte

Nuclear processes in the core of the earth

In the center of the earth nuclear processes - where heavy radioactive atomic nucleus decays into iron - creates heat. This heat is transferred to the Earth’s surface. This kind of energy is called Geothermal Energy

When we drill deep into the Danish underground, we can utilize this heat energy. We call this "Geothermal".

Scroll for at forsætte

Mandmade fusion

We are working on - under controlled conditions - to create fusion processes on earth. This energy source is also called "nuclear energy".

If we succeed in developing the fusion process, we can also call it for renewable energy, as there are infinitely fuel on earth to be used in fusion processes. Nuclear energy can be divided into "Fission" in which heavy atomic nuclei are separated and "Fusion" in which light atomic nuclei fusion together.

Scroll for at forsætte

Gravitational forces from the moon

The last source of energy in the series comes from the moon's motion around the earth and the earth's rotation. The waters of the oceans are attracted to the moon, creating tides.

In some places, the tidal differences are so great that energy through tidal power plants with water turbines can be utilized in our energy system.

Scroll for at forsætte

Find the answer to the question

How many sources of spring energy are there?

Vælg det rigtige svar

  • 5
  • 6
  • 7


This is a unique website which will require a more modern browser to work!

Please upgrade today!